Featured retailer: Two Hands Paperie

Our goal is to help you make things with your own two hands.  

Two Hands Paperie began on Pearl Street, in the beautiful city of Boulder, CO. in 1993 as a small bindery with a few hand-bound books and a small rack of decorative paper. Mia Semingson and Gerald Trainor took over the store in January of 2010, “Mia and I both shopped at the store just about from the time it opened in 1993, says Gerald. “ Mia apprenticed with Diana (the founder) as a bookbinder and worked in the store for many years. We also did custom printing and bookbinding from our own studio for the store before just taking over the whole thing. So, we were intimately associated with just about the entire process and most of the products before we became the owners. It was a sort of natural progression. “

Read More

A very brief history of letterpress

history-letterpress

Letterpress is a form of relief printing in which the raised surface of text and images is inked and then pushed onto paper. The resulting print can be a deep impression, easily felt and seen on soft paper. Although the impression was not initially a desired effect by trade printers, today it is one of the most charming and interesting characteristics of craft letterpress.

As far back as the eighth century, the Chinese were performing woodblock printing. In fact, it is believed that a Chinese man named Bi Sheng (c. 990-1051) invented movable clay type in the 11th century—a painstaking process that involved placing thinly cut pieces of baked clay upon an iron

plate covered with heated resin and wax, and then pressing a board upon it to form the print. Read More

The THANK YOU NOTE in 3 easy steps: Make it quick. Make it easy. Make it classy.

Be careful not to overlook an important aspect of the gift-giving season: thank-you notes.

The thought behind the thank-you should be equal to, or greater than, the thought that went into the gift. But it does not have to be the chore we all dread. In fact, if you follow the “3” rule, you can have this chore beat in no time.

In 3 days… Ideally the thank you note should be written within 3 days of receiving the gift. However, even if it’s much later, it is still special.

On 3 lines… That’s all it takes. (Not including the salutation or your signature)

Make 3 statements

·     Acknowledge the gift, (“How thoughtful of you to remember that I love teapots.”)

·     Explain what you will do with the gift, (“I have a box of Earl Grey that I am dying to try.”)

·     Express a future meeting or hope of a meeting, (“Looking forward to seeing you at Jack’s party in a few weeks.”)

That’s it. Sign your note. How easy is that!?

Now, there IS one thing more thing that must be done…but this is the fun part! No matter the occasion, start with the paper, the actual card.

When choosing the perfect stationary, look for one that’s elaborate in detail and intricate in design. Envelop lining and artwork, heavier card stock, decals, embellishments and gold leaf script, always boast well. Once retrieved in the mail, it will stand out from the mundane and make the recipient feel special.

Emily Post suggests,” the letter you write, whether you realize it or not, is always a mirror which reflects your appearance, taste and character.”

What a joy to receive a rare treasure —a handwritten thank you note from a family member or friend. No one has to know just how easy it

was!

Giving Thanks

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”

John Fitzgerald Kennedy

192

 
 

Thanksgiving is America’s most celebrated tradition. It falls every year on the fourth Thursday in the month of November.  Its origin can be traced back to the 16th century when the first thanksgiving dinner is said to have taken place.

In 1609, a group of Puritans fleeing religious persecution in England moved to Holland. They ­lived in Holland for a number of years until, in 1620, a group of English investors — the Merchant Adventurers — financed a trip for more than 100 passengers to the New World. On Sept. 6, 1620, 102 passengers set sail on a ship called the Mayflower, a 17th century sailing vessel leaving from England. The pilgrims reached Plymouth Rock on December 11th 1620, after a sea journey of 66 days.  Many did not make the final landing in Plymouth (Massachusetts), succumbing to the extreme cold. Still many others perished from that first cold winter in Plymouth without much food.

In the spring of 1621, native Indians taught the pilgrims to survive by growing food. With their help, the Pilgrims were able to survive in the New World. They were taught how to get sap out of the maple trees, how to avoid plants that were poisonous and how to plant corn, beans and pumpkins. In the autumn of 1621, Plymouth Colony’s first governor, William Bradford, decided to throw a celebratory feast and invited the colony’s American Indian neighbors to take part. The American Indians brought food as well, and the celebration is said to have lasted for three days. The grand feast was organized to thank God for his favors. This communal dinner is popularly known as the “first thanksgiving”. It’s uncl­ear whether the Pilgrims themselves called that first feast a thanksgiving celebration, but they were certainly celebrating the abundance of food and the peace with their American Indian neighbors. There is however, no evidence to prove if the dinner actually took place; some historians believe pilgrims were quite religious in which case, their thanksgiving would have included a day of fasting and praying. Other historians say that the dinner did indeed take place.

It wasn’t until several years later, after enduring a month’s long drought, that Thanksgiving was celebrated in earnest. In response to the hot, dry summer months, the governor called for a fast. Soon afterward, rain revived the shriveled crops, and the Puritans celebrated.

The custom of marking good fortune with a day of gratitude quickly caught on throughout New England. In the early days of the United States, the new nation’s leaders began proclaiming country-wide thanksgiving celebrations. In the American Revolution, for example, the Continental Congress called for a day of thanksgiving to mark the U.S. victory at the Battle of Saratoga. Then in 1789, President George Washington called for a day of thanksgiving in recognition of the U.S. Constitution’s ratification.

Although its origins are traced back to that first thanksgiving in 1621, a number of other countries celebrate harvest related festivals. They are observed with different names and in different seasons. Harvest related festivals, all the over the world are characterized with fun and merrymaking, for the most part, celebrating communal harmony. Each region has its unique customs and traditions to jubilate the occasion. 

Canada celebrates thanksgiving on the second Monday in the month of October .The first Canadian thanksgiving was celebrated on 15th April 1872 to thank the recovery of King Edward VII from serious illness. The next thanksgiving was celebrated after a few years in 1879 on a Thursday. 
Canada later, had a turbulent time deciding the day of national Thanksgiving. It fluctuated between Mondays some years and Thursday in others. Finally, on January 31, 1957, Parliament announced the second Monday in the month of October as the official ‘Thanksgiving Day’. It was declared as “a day of general Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed.” The thanksgiving celebrations include parades, customary ‘family feast’ and ‘turkey’. It is a time for sharing, loving and family reunions. The central idea behind the celebration is to be thankful for the past harvest and praying for the coming year. 

 India also has a number of harvest related festivals in different regions. Though the underlying principle behind each of them is same, every festival is exclusive and different from the other.

Other Asian countries such as China, Malaysia, and Korea celebrate the festival on different dates. Each festival has a folklore attached to it. Harmony, peace, and feeling gratitude is the underlying theme of each celebration.
Many view the first Thanksgiving as an example of the possibility of great respect and cooperation between two different cultures.

177

On that note, we here at Rossi1931 are extremely grateful that you take the time to read our blog and we extend a gracious thank you for your support. We couldn’t do what we do without you, your loyalty and your passion for paper.

“A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all other virtues”~Cicero

The Write Touch, the art of civilized communication.

The Write Touch is eager to share their love of paper. Their incredible shop in the San Marco section of Jacksonville, Florida, is a paper gourmet’s dream. The shelves are full of refined and whimsical boxed notes and offer an eclectic mix of stationery, custom invitations, leather goods, gifts and accessories. For more than thirty years, the store has been the consummate resource for the art of civilized communication.

In 2007, when customer, Carolyn Hawthorne learned the shop was for sale, she was instantly smitten.

After extensive renovations, Carolyn reopened the store with Tucker, her now fourteen-year-old Golden Retriever, by her side. In 2011, Golden puppy Nicholas joined the family. The boys have been featured in the majority of advertising campaigns for the shop and are dear friends of many customers.  You will find them lounging near the front door waiting for a friendly pat hello.

With career experience in journalism, specialty retail and fine art, Carolyn came to The Write Touch with an eye for quality and design. Carefully curating her collection of goods, she buys from artisans around the globe as well as pieces made in the USA.

Carolyn and her staff, including delightful and talented manager, Rebekah (who actually made a full size bridal gown in their front window from wedding invitations!) both love the quality and designs of Rossi. They offer custom printing and monogramming on any paper purchased in the store. Once the selection has been made and the desired information shared, they will promptly provide proofs featuring a variety of typestyle and ink options. 

The Write Touch, 904-398-2009

1967 San Marco Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida 32207 

www.thewritetouch.com

Calligraphy: alive and very well

Calligraphy, the art of beautiful hand lettering, dates back to 213 B.C. One might think that it would never survive the onslaught of modern day technology, but it is thriving in an environment of computer fonts. Nowhere is it more apparent, than at Calligraphic Arts in Dallas, Texas. Susie-Melissa Cherry is known as one of the world’s foremost calligraphers and a mentor in her profession, creating artwork and designs for noteworthy clients such as Queen Elizabeth, Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, Louis Vuitton and a lengthy list of notables and businesses worldwide. Of course her local clients in the Dallas area and beyond feel extremely fortunate to have one of the best for their special lettering and design needs.

Any artist knows the importance of one’s canvas; Susie-Melissa especially loves the Italian made Rossi papers, “I love Rossi papers because they are perfect for lettering. They provide good clean lines and strokes. The papers hold the ink just the way I like to create bold, strong impressions. It is especially great for colored inks.”

She has been a Rossi customer since 2008 and especially loves the Diploma Collection for its vegetable parchment. It’s a favorite for announcements and artwork.

She says her customers are “very hands on” and they choose Rossi for the unique classy designs and the look it creates, and,” they love the square envelopes.”

When not in her gorgeous store or design studio, she teaches calligraphy at a Dallas university. She has “between 40-50 students generally” and they love to use Rossi plain vegetable parchment paper because it “holds the ink so well.”

It’s only fitting that since calligraphy began with the Romans that Rossi Paper be the choice of artists like Susie-Melissa and others.

 

 

Ten Ways to Makeover a Wedding Invitation

Can a store-bought wedding invitation be changed up for ten different looks?  And can it be accomplished on a budget?  You bet!

Using simple and inexpensive ideas, a standard invitation package was transformedinvitation-group[1] into ten unique, stylish versions. This DIY invitation  comes to us from Shelly and Megan, the creative mother/daughter team who founded online retailer, Paper Mojo.

For this makeover, Shelly used a classic Rossi patterned decorative sheet from the Flowers collection (TSC 027).

Here are Shelly’s simple instructions:

#1: Add an envelope liner

#1 Add an envelope liner. Our invitation came with a square flap envelope.  All it takes is one square of cut paper and double-sided tape to secure the liner.  With the extra paper, we added a wide belly band, holding all the pieces together, neat and tidy.

#2: Add a fuscia backer card

 

#2 Add a Fuscia backer card.  The purchased invitation is actually a little smaller than 5” x 7” (4.875” x 6.878”), making it easy to add a standard size backer card.

 

 

#3: all pieces backed with black cardstock

 

 

#3 Add drama with black.  Adding black backer sheets provides a thicker border and focuses the eye on the invite copy.

 

#4: Black backer laminated with Flowered sheet, cord tie and tag

 

 

#4 Create a package by laminating to the Rossi paper. Add a black cord tie and tag. Who doesn’t love to open a package!

 

#5: Add a fancy pocket

 

 

#5 Adding a fancy pocket  organizes the content – response card, directions, etc.. especially if you prefer to keep the front side completely original.

invite6-4[1]

 

#6  Add the Rossi sheet to the back of the invitation, directions and response card and tie the bundle together with a coordinating ribbon. This is another good way to introduce color and pattern into your invitation.

 

7

#7 Create a gatefold by placing the invite on larger paper – 5 x 7- then scoring and folding the sides. Add a bellyband and secure with an elegant monogram tag.

 

 

8

 

#8 Add a contrasting color envelope and backer card for a country look.  Switch the envelope to a pointed flap and you have a completely different look.

 

9

 

#9 Use a bit of origami style folding to create a decorative paper closure on a folded card. The result looks elegant and classic and holds the invitation together in a unique way. Inside, a simple band secures the invitation enclosures.

 

10 b

#10  Add elegance with a pocket fold invitation jacket. They’re available in a variety of sizes and shapes so a standard size invitation will nicely fill the center panel. The pocket fold is lined like an envelope and the outside gets a layered seal, allowing it to easily open and close.

Shelly says that most of these ideas work well for a beginner paper crafter and require only basic paper crafting tools like scissors and paper cutter or trimmer.  What’s truly amazing is the affordability …. usually only a few dollars to completely transform the look.

Want to learn more?  Shelly provides detailed instructions, a cost breakdown, and additional photos on the Paper Mojo website.

For more information, visit www.rossi1931.it

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...